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lolshtus:

Nontoxic Face Paint Put To Good Use

lolshtus:

Nontoxic Face Paint Put To Good Use

bestqualitybeksinski:

Zdzisław Beksiński

bestqualitybeksinski:

Zdzisław Beksiński

(via bonesex)

(via youthofathousandsummers)

vegan-xicano:

slidan:

tinyhousesgalore:

Tiny house built by Heirloom Custom Tiny Homes in Oregon. See more here!

The dream.

These aren’t too expensive. 

bvddhist:

Organic  // Spiritual  // Hippie

bvddhist:

Organic  // Spiritual  // Hippie 

(via moon-medicine)

tastefullyoffensive:

This is what happens when you don’t separate your colors and whites.[via]

tastefullyoffensive:

This is what happens when you don’t separate your colors and whites.

[via]

(via smog121)

princeokittens:

impulsively uploaded a demo that’s gonna be on the album because i almost cried while playing this tonight

jam to this if u feel it’s right

We never say that all men deserve to feel beautiful. We never say that each man is beautiful in his own way. We don’t have huge campaigns aimed at young boys trying to convince them that they’re attractive, probably because we very rarely correlate a man’s worth with his appearance. The problem is that a woman’s value in this world is still very much attached to her appearance, and telling her that she should or deserves to feel beautiful does more to promote that than negate it. Telling women that they “deserve” to feel pretty plays right in to the idea that prettiness should be important to them. And having books and movies aimed at young women where every female protagonist turns out to be beautiful (whereas many of the antagonists are described in much less flattering terms) reinforces the message that beauty has some kind of morality attached to it, and that all heroines are somehow pretty.

You Don’t Have To Be Pretty – On YA Fiction And Beauty As A Priority | The Belle Jar (via brutereason)

(via pearlsandink)

(via whiite-trash-beautiful)

mikemakai:

A Note About Coin Striping, by Mike Makai
Abrasion play, in general, requires little or no specialized equipment or toys. For the most part, the only thing needed is an adequately rough surface to rub against your subject’s skin. Examples can include sandpaper, steel wool, pot scrubbers, cleaning brushes, toothbrushes, Emory boards, nail files, rasps, or even your own fingernails. The concept is really quite simple: rub, rasp or scratch the subject’s skin until it becomes sensitive, raw, or painful. This can be an end in itself, or a means to other ends, such as serving as a precursor to impact play, violet wand play, or other activities. We’ll cover more specific safety issues near the end, once I’ve explained this particular form of abrasion play.A therapeutic form of abrasion play that I happen to enjoy is one that is practiced widely in Asia to treat aches and pains, chills, and various minor illnesses. Since the practice lacks an English-language name that I’m aware of, I simply refer to it as “coin striping.” It typically consists of having a subject lie on his or her stomach, disrobed from the waist up. The Top takes a quarter, and applies a small dab of mentholated oil or muscle rub (such as Ben Gay or Icy Hot) to either the coin or to a spot on the subject’s back. Then, gripping the coin firmly, he rubs the dab of liniment into the skin using the corrugated edge of the quarter. The quarter is drawn repeatedly in a long steady motion across the skin in one direction only, along the same path in such a way that, after about a dozen passes, a bright red line begins to appear on the skin. Stop abrading that line when it’s glowing red, but before it begins to rupture the skin. Choose another spot about an inch from the first line, and repeat the process, creating another parallel red stripe across the back in the same fashion. Continue until the entire back is covered in glowing red stripes. The visual effect of the stripes can last anywhere from one to four days, depending on the subject’s skin type and resiliency.Some people enjoy creating intricate and attractive patterns in this fashion. The edge of the quarter forces the mentholated oils through the skin, and each stripe produces a hot sensation that lasts several hours. When the entire back is covered in coin stripes, the subject will usually feel toasty warm all night long, which can be particularly soothing for anyone with chills, aches, or pains. In many parts of Asia, people pay for professional treatments of this sort in much the same way they go for massages, acupuncture, or cupping. The procedure is rare enough in the U.S. that the sight of your red stripes may elicit some concerned reactions from some people. After all, it looks as if a scurvy pirate has tied you to the ship’s mainsail mast and given you fifty lashes. I usually recommend that anyone who will be going to see a doctor within the next few days delay their abrasion play until after their appointment!The safety concerns related to abrasion play are minimal, with the main worry being infection. The wider the area of skin that is rubbed raw, the greater the possibility will be of harmful bacteria passing through the distressed skin and into the bloodstream. The Top should always wash his hands thoroughly with a strong antibacterial soap and sanitize the bottom’s back with an alcohol or peroxide wipe prior to the procedure. Any stripes that result in breaks in the skin should be treated as open wounds to prevent the transmission of disease or infection and to promote healing.Curiously enough, this is a skill that was taught to me by my Asian mother when I was a child (along with cupping) so I could perform it on her when she was feeling under the weather. I’ve not met many other people in the United States who do it.Mike Makai

mikemakai:

A Note About Coin Striping, by Mike Makai

Abrasion play, in general, requires little or no specialized equipment or toys. For the most part, the only thing needed is an adequately rough surface to rub against your subject’s skin. Examples can include sandpaper, steel wool, pot scrubbers, cleaning brushes, toothbrushes, Emory boards, nail files, rasps, or even your own fingernails. The concept is really quite simple: rub, rasp or scratch the subject’s skin until it becomes sensitive, raw, or painful. This can be an end in itself, or a means to other ends, such as serving as a precursor to impact play, violet wand play, or other activities. We’ll cover more specific safety issues near the end, once I’ve explained this particular form of abrasion play.

A therapeutic form of abrasion play that I happen to enjoy is one that is practiced widely in Asia to treat aches and pains, chills, and various minor illnesses. Since the practice lacks an English-language name that I’m aware of, I simply refer to it as “coin striping.” It typically consists of having a subject lie on his or her stomach, disrobed from the waist up. The Top takes a quarter, and applies a small dab of mentholated oil or muscle rub (such as Ben Gay or Icy Hot) to either the coin or to a spot on the subject’s back. Then, gripping the coin firmly, he rubs the dab of liniment into the skin using the corrugated edge of the quarter. The quarter is drawn repeatedly in a long steady motion across the skin in one direction only, along the same path in such a way that, after about a dozen passes, a bright red line begins to appear on the skin. Stop abrading that line when it’s glowing red, but before it begins to rupture the skin. Choose another spot about an inch from the first line, and repeat the process, creating another parallel red stripe across the back in the same fashion. Continue until the entire back is covered in glowing red stripes. The visual effect of the stripes can last anywhere from one to four days, depending on the subject’s skin type and resiliency.

Some people enjoy creating intricate and attractive patterns in this fashion. The edge of the quarter forces the mentholated oils through the skin, and each stripe produces a hot sensation that lasts several hours. When the entire back is covered in coin stripes, the subject will usually feel toasty warm all night long, which can be particularly soothing for anyone with chills, aches, or pains. In many parts of Asia, people pay for professional treatments of this sort in much the same way they go for massages, acupuncture, or cupping. The procedure is rare enough in the U.S. that the sight of your red stripes may elicit some concerned reactions from some people. After all, it looks as if a scurvy pirate has tied you to the ship’s mainsail mast and given you fifty lashes. I usually recommend that anyone who will be going to see a doctor within the next few days delay their abrasion play until after their appointment!

The safety concerns related to abrasion play are minimal, with the main worry being infection. The wider the area of skin that is rubbed raw, the greater the possibility will be of harmful bacteria passing through the distressed skin and into the bloodstream. The Top should always wash his hands thoroughly with a strong antibacterial soap and sanitize the bottom’s back with an alcohol or peroxide wipe prior to the procedure. Any stripes that result in breaks in the skin should be treated as open wounds to prevent the transmission of disease or infection and to promote healing.

Curiously enough, this is a skill that was taught to me by my Asian mother when I was a child (along with cupping) so I could perform it on her when she was feeling under the weather. I’ve not met many other people in the United States who do it.

Mike Makai

(via kasha-cupcakes)

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